Sunday lunch at The Three Crowns

March 6, 2017

 

About time I put up one my Leicester Mercury reviews. This one is of a very pleasant Sunday lunch at The Three Crowns in Wymeswold.  I’m not saying this is destination dining, but you know when you’ve had one of those meals out and you keep giving little mental ticks at things that have been nicely done?  That was this – good fresh ingredients cooked and presented with care can go a long way.

The Three Crowns

45 Far Street
Wymeswold
Leicestershire
LE12 6TZ
01509 880011

 

Cost: Sunday lunch £15 two courses, £19 three courses.

 

three crowns

 

Wymeswold is a rather lucky village. It’s got a first-rate fine dining pub in the shape of the Hammer and Pincers, then there’s the Windmill which is part of the lively Little Britain Pub family of gastropubs and now a third pub offering good food.

The Three Crowns was traditionally more of a drinkers’ pub but last summer it was rented from Punch Taverns by cricketers Stuart Broad and Harry Gurney and given an extensive smartening up, along with help from their pal Dan Cramp who has made a great success of the Larwood and Voce pub at Trent Bridge. Sensibly, it’s not a cricket themed pub – no Square Leg of Lamb or whatever. Indeed there’s no overt links to its owners, just a nice and tidy English village pub with pictures of old Wymeswold on the walls and some ancient low beams which caused a regular problem for our 6ft 3in barman.

Our Sunday lunchtime visit didn’t get off to a great start. It had been a bad enough week for City fans without going into a pub and seeing Harry Kane’s face on the television celebrating yet another hat-trick. Fortunately our table space was in a quiet little corner away from the main TV area and we could focus on the food and drink. The pub still has that pubby feel but the weekday menu is veering towards restaurant territory with the likes of chicken liver parfait with winter fruit chutney at £5 and pan fried sea trout with leeks, mash and pesto at £11. It’s the kind of menu you look at and think – if this is done well, it looks a bargain but if their heart’s not really in it, it could be very dull.

On Sunday it’s £15 for two courses, £19 for three and there’s a choice of around four starters. One look at ours when they arrived suggested we were going to be fine. A block of ham hock terrine looked lovely – deep pink meat flecked with green herbs. It tasted fine too. With some cornichons, a teeny little pan with some fiery English mustard, a few microherbs and a big doorstep of excellent toast it was an entirely pleasing assembly. The same could be said of a superficially simple starter of Colston Basset stilton with pear, walnuts and gem lettuce. Not only were the individual ingredients all delightfully fresh, but they worked together splendidly. The cheese, lightly crumbled here, was creamy and the nuts were super fresh. There’s not much worse on a plate than nuts that have gone a bit stale but these were big, fat and crunchy and matched harmoniously the rich cheese while the neatly-pared slivers of pear added sweetness.

Sunday lunch can sometimes be treated as a bit of a cash cow by pubs, so it was nice to see a level of care and precision being applied in this unpretentious setting. There were three real ales on tap, including the fruity Black Sheep from Masham in North Yorkshire which was a good match for ham hock, while from the craft beer section the spicier Rare Red rye from Caledonian stood up well to the mild cheese.

Main courses on Sunday were beef top side, loin of pork, chicken breast or roasted celeriac risotto with basil pesto. The beef was offered “pink or cooked through” – an ambitious promise during a long Sunday service but we ordered and it came precisely as pink as you’d want. It had excellent flavour too. The yorkie was superb – crunchy but not brittle around the edges, fluffy and not soggy in the middle, virtues shared by the excellent roasted spuds too. Kale and cauliflower were perfectly cooked too – in fact probably the only issue we had with anything during our lunch was the rather insipid gravy. Not horrid, just a bit of a let-down when everything else was bringing nods of approval. A shared glass of a big, fruity Argentinian Malbec was suggested to go with the beef and it was indeed a lovely addition.

The pork loin was well-flavoured but also with dull gravy. I suspect a few pork lovers would have been disappointed with the small slivers of crackling but too me this was just right – a wee mouthful to give a hint of crunch but no inedible tooth-threatening slab.

We shared a desert straight out of the home-cooked comfort food canon – pineapple upside down cake. It was a fine version – lightly browned on top, nice light sponge inside and surrounded by a light and frothy custard laced with rum.

Staff were young, friendly and cheerful and service was prompt and helpful. It all added up to a nice relaxed Sunday environment. Whichever venue you choose in Wymeswold, with Springtime on the horizon the village is a good choice for city and town dweller looking for a run out to the country.

 

 

 

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