Cafe Delhi

April 24, 2018

delhi chaat

Samosa Chaat

Another month, another leading Leicester Indian restaurant launches a brand-extension vegetarian branch.

After the launch of Kayal’s stunning Herb, the well-established, high-performing Memsaab in Highcross has launched Cafe Delhi in the highly competitive environment of Melton Road. Memsaab is themed around ladies of the Raj, and the new restaurant also has a thoroughly worked-through theme, in this case the street food scene of Delhi.

There’s been no shortage  of vegetarian food in the area, from Bobby’s  – which had legendary status even when I rocked up in Leicester in 1983 – to numerous sweet marts doing a fine line in bhajis, dhokla, samosas and other sweet and savoury snacks. Cafe Delhi though is a lot smarter than most though. It’s got a handsome blue (teal? turquoise?) and gold colour scheme and plenty of fun retro prints with an open kitchen behind a big window at the far end.

The menu is broad and more, erm, pragmatic than the relatively purist Herb. So here there are plenty of “soya” dishes and contemporary streetfood favourites such as Nepali momo, Manchurian dumplings and even Chip Butty inspired by , well, let’s say Yorkshire. I’m assuming most of it either is or could be made vegan if you leave out the yoghurt, but you’ll obviously need to check.

We had a quick lunch today and the food was terrific. Light and  fluffy idli (steamed rice and lentil cakes) came with an amazing sambhar – richer and sweeter than most – and coconut chutney. Samosa chat is probably the dish I dream about most away from Leicester and this was a hugely enjoyable one. The balance of soft pastry, nicely spiced chick pea curry, crispy vermicelli, cooling yoghurt and sweet tangy tamrind is heavenly. A tandoori roti was one of the best breads I’ve encountered for a long-time – beautifully soft and flaky. The masala chai, coming in a beautifully decorated tea pot,  was a bit too reserved for me – I like it pungent and fragrant.

cafedelhi

Service on weekday lunchtime was a bit too laid back for our liking – our dishes came five minutes apart and staff seemed a bit preoccupied – but I’m definitely going back.  Chaats and snacks are around £3 to £5, with a range of curries and veggie tandoori kebabs at £5/6.  Especially appealing seems the thali at £10.95, served up on crescent-shaped copper thalis which fit snugly around your plate.

Cafe Delhi
47 Melton Rd
Leicester LE4 6PN
0116 266 5500

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Memsaab

August 30, 2010

I know of several restaurateurs who had a look at moving into the Highcross restaurant quarter but were put off by the rents. The only independent to bite the bullet and take it on from the earliest days was Memsaab, which had  been open – on  and off  – round the corner on Vaughan Way for a few years. They decided to tackle the challenge by keeping more or less the the same menu but taking the place upmarket, and it’s good to report they’re  making  a very able job of it.

You enter into a champange and cocktail lounge , where you are also likely to be serendaded by a live pianist and vocalist.  Ok the red and black colourscheme is a bit hackneyed, but visiting on a  Saturday after a dispiriting home defeat to Reading, the lively buzz about the place immediately started to cheer me up. There were several big birthday parties in but the layout of the place enables the larger groups and  couples and smaller groups to be separated out. Our table for four was in the glass walled section that has a pleasing  view over the urban bustle of  Highcross.    

So full marks for the atmosphere, but fortunately the food is well up to the mark too. It’s a fairly traditional offering  – and doesn’t really reach the culinary heights of its Nottingham namesake – but is nonetheless consistently impressive.  Poppadoms came with a superior set of chuntneys. A starter of chicken shashlick was excellent – three huge chunks of succulent, marinated chicken breast that showed a generous and adventurous hand with the spices.  Chicken and fish pakora, coming  with a lively coriander relish, were very made and well cooked too  – the fish was so good it really should be offered as a choice on its own.  Chilli tiger prawns showed plenty of bite and again the cooking of the prawns was excellent. Considering the sizeable groups that were being served, the kitchen was doing a fine job at getting out the orders on time and in good shape.

Our mains courses dishes all convinced – quality ingredients, lively spicing and accurate cooking.  Lamb dehi wala  was mild and yoghurty, vegetable dhaaalcha was far more interesting than lentils and chickpeas  might suggest while parathas were flakey  and flavoursome.

Service was  good – welcoming and thoughtful. A minor accident in serving the pakora was dealt with speedily and correctly.

There’s a special place in all hearts for our favourite neighbourhood Indian restauarant, a fact that can make us wary of places that offer a bit  more glamour. But Memsaab pulls it off very well.

Great Food

July 23, 2010

I started this blog mainly because I just wanted to keep writing about food, and local restaurants in particular.  I’d spent five enjoyable years doing proper independent  reviews for Metro, and when that finished I was frustrated there was not better media coverage of  the local food scene. There was the defiantly non-specialist reviews in the Leicester Mercury, the blatant  advertorials in a couple of rather vacuous style mags and the equally ad-grab reviews in the county set mags. A rather dull Midlands glossy called The Foodie occasionally gets over to Leicestershire.

So hurray for the newly-launched bi-monthly Great Food Leicestershire and Rutland, a glossy magazine that does what it says in the tin. Coming straight outta Melton Mowbray it’s a commerical proposition but one that does seem to be driven by a genuine passion for the area and for good food. The first issue has news of local events and products, features such as a farmshop map, and articles on  producers such as Nigel Moon at Whissendine Mill and local produce including stilton, bread from the Hambleton  bakery (which you will have read about on this blog of course) and local beers.  Local towns and villages are profiled for eating and drinking options, local chefs such as Danny Jimminson from the Hammer and Pincers and Adi Sinha from Memsaab contribute articles and recipes and there’s reviews of other places familar to readers of this blog  – including the Collyweston  Slater. Sure the reviews are all positive, but  they do give the impression at least of being genuine recommendations rather quid pro qu0 for adverts.

The articles are generally short and sweet, there’s a refreshing lack of pretention or ponciness and the photography and layout are good quality. Overall, it’s a terrific start and congratulations to editor Matthew Wright.  You can find out more at their website www.greatfoodleics.co.uk  and if you are quick you may be able to get a free copy of the July/August issue. If you do contact them, you might like to mention this blog.

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